Realism Lesson 4

Print

The Setting Tells the Tale (Elementary)

Download this Lesson

The Setting Tells the Tale is appropriate for elementary students. From Ordinary to Extraordinary, Lesson Three, is appropriate for secondary students.

Objectives

  1. Students will be able to use the positioning of a character to create drama or help tell a story.
  2. Students will be able to use setting to create drama or help tell a story.

Arizona Visual Arts Standards

  • CREATE: Meanings & Purposes: PO 101: Select and use subject matter and/or symbols in his or her artwork.
  • CREATE: Meanings & Purposes: PO 201: Explain purposeful use of subject matter, symbols and/or themes in his or her artwork.
  • CREATE: Quality: PO 101 & 201: Identify successful aspects of his or her own artwork and possible revisions.

Preparation

  • Preview The Setting Tells the Tale PowerPoint.
  • If your students need help with basic shading, How did they do that? PowerPoint in the elementary Masters of Illusion unit may be useful.
  • If you are considering extending this drawing project into bookmaking, view Making My Own Book Power-Point in the Read Me a Picture unit to see several simple bookmaking processes.

Resources and Supplies

Supplementary

Activities
Review: Review the theme in life that “Each of us has a point of view that affects how we see and respond
to our world” and the theme in art that “Artists manipulate the viewer’s point of view to create drama in
their artwork.”
 
Also review the unit’s three key questions. Lessons One and Two focus on questions to help students better understand another artist’s work. In this lesson they will focus on versions of those questions to help them make decisions in their own artwork.

  1. What point of view did the artist choose for this artwork? (What point of view shall I choose for my artwork?)
  2. How has the artist positioned objects/characters within the setting of the artwork? (What object/character and setting shall I choose for my artwork?)
  3. How can an artist’s choices create drama or help tell a story? (How can I increase drama or tell a story in my artwork?)

Definition and Examples: Display the first two slides of The Setting Tells the Tale PowerPoint to define a setting as the things that surround the main subject in an artwork.

Guided Practice: Display and discuss slides 3-8 to illustrate a variety of settings and show how they dramatize the main subject or help tell a story about it.

Review: Display slides 9-14 to remind students that objects look different in different positions and viewed from different points of view.

Assignment: Explain to students that they are to demonstrate what they’ve learned by making a drawing that tells a story. Display slide 15 to show characters student might choose and slides 16-19 to help students think about stories.

Step-By-Step-Instructions: Show slides 20-25 to illustrate steps:

  • Slide 20: Select a “character” or main subject and think about its position or point of view.
  • Slide 21: Create a setting for your character. First, make a light sketch. Then trace lines and finally add some color.
  • Slide 22: Give your drawing a title.
  • Slides 23 & 24: An elementary student’s drawings of his dog in different settings, complete with titles.
  • Slide 25: Review of steps in the assignment.

In-Process Feedback: After students have completed their light sketches, ask them to partner with one or two classmates to show their drawings and share the story they are illustrating to seek feedback and suggestions.

Presentation: Display completed drawings and ask students, in turn, to read their titles. Lead a discussion
with the following questions:

  1. What drawing/s illustrates the title really well? Explain.
  2. Point to a drawing/s in which the position of the character or the point of view on the character helps tell the story. Explain.
  3. Point to a drawing/s in which the setting helps tell a story? Explain.
  4. What part of the process was most difficult to do? Why?
  5. How do you think you might use what you learned through making this drawing in a future artwork?

Vocabulary

  • subject
  • character
  • setting
  • position
  • point of view (viewpoint)
  • confined
  • Extension Ideas

ENGLISH and ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS: The images in the The Setting Tells the Tale PowerPoint offer numerous opportunities to practice using directional and positioning words such as left/right, up/down, above/below, in front of/behind, on top of/under, beside/inside/outside, etc.

ENGLISH: Students can learn to build complex sentences by adding details about the character and the character’s position in the setting. The following example focuses on slide 19 in The Setting Tells the Tale PowerPoint:

  • The horse...
  • The horse with the black mane and tail...
  • The horse with the black mane and tail and spots on its behind...
  • The horse with the black mane and tail and spots on its behind is standing on a rock...
  • The horse with the black mane and tail and spots on its behind is standing on a bumpy rock...
  • The horse with the black mane and tail and spots on its behind is standing on a bumpy rock at the edge of the Grand Canyon.

BOOKMAKING: A small group of students might choose one of the photographs on slide 16-18 to tell a story. They can begin by building a complex sentence describing the character in its setting (see extension idea above). Then they can extend the story by explaining how the character got there, as well as what will happen next. They might even work together to write and illustrate a hand-made book. See Read Me a Picture unit for several simple bookmaking processes.

Secondary Assessment Guides

OBJECTIVE 1: Students will be able to use the positioning of a character to create drama or help tell a story.

  • Exceeds Expectations: The position of the character clearly reinforces the title of the drawing.
  • Meets Expectations: The position of the character is related in some way to the title of the drawing.
  • Approaches Expectations: The character is positioned in an unusual way.
  • Fails to Meet Expectations: The character is shown in its most typical position.

OBJECTIVE 2: Students will be able to use setting to create drama or help tell a story.

  • Exceeds Expectations: The setting of the character clearly reinforces or enhances the story suggested by the title of the drawing.
  • Meets Expectations: The setting of the character is related in some way to the title of the drawing.
  • Approaches Expectations: The character is shown within a setting.
  • Fails to Meet Expectations: The character is shown without a setting.