Lesson 4

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Animal Portraits

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Objectives

  • Students use a variety of values (lights and darks).
  • Students use accurate sizes of facial features in portraits.

Arizona Visual Arts Standards

  • RELATE: Elements & Principles: PO 101, 201 & 301: Identify (Analyze) visual/tactile characteristics of artworks from diverse cultures, different places or time.

Preparation

  • Preview “Animal Portraits” PowerPoint
  • Locate photographs or printouts of a variety of animals. You might invite students to bring to class their own photos of pets or favorite animals.
  • Decide whether you will use the “Animal Faces” pdf worksheet to give students practice analyzing values.

Resources and Supplies

  • “Animal Portraits” PowerPoint
  • Collection of photographs or printouts of animal images.
  • Pencils
  • Sketch paper
  • Erasers
  • Middle-tone construction paper or charcoal
  • Earth tone, black and white pastels, chalks or crayons
  • OPTIONAL: Animal Faces (pdf)

Activities

Review the theme in life that “groups of people often share ideas, yet each individual makes his or her own personal choices” and the theme in art that “artists’ styles are both personal and influenced by the world around them.” Also review the unit’s three key questions:

  1. How do artists use value (light and dark)?
  2. How do parts of a face fit together to make a portrait?
  3. What are the distinctive characteristics of an individual artist’s style?

Assignment: Explain that each student will be making an animal portrait that will be similar in style to his or her classmates because they will all focus on value and sizes of the parts of the face. Also explain that each student’s portrait will have that student’s personal or individual style because each student will choose the animal, the animal’s expression, the view of the animal’s head and details he or she wants to show.

Step-By-Step-Instructions: Show “Animal Portraits” PowerPoint

  1. Choose animal
  2. Choose view of head
  3. Choose to use paper horizontally or vertically
  4. Look carefully at the sizes of parts of the animal’s face and head
  5. Make a sketch
  6. Analyze values (lights and darks)
  7. Sketch animal LIGHTLY on middle tone paper.
  8. Add white.
  9. Add black.
  10. Add middle tones by letting the paper show through.

In-Process Feedback: Ask students to share their photographs and sketches with a classmate and ask for suggestions about making the sizes of parts of the face or head more accurate.

Presentation: Display animal portraits. Ask students to suggest feelings or personalities expressed by their classmates’ portraits (e.g. sweet, angry, excited, happy, sad, sleepy, etc.). Ask students to point to particular parts in the portrait that are accurate in size and to also point out blacks, whites and middle values.

Vocabulary

  • Portrait
  • Profile
  • Vertical
  • Individual
  • Angled View
  • Middle-tone
  • Expression
  • Direction
  • Full Face
  • Horizontal

Extension Idea

  • SCIENCE: Animal species

Secondary Assessment Guides
OBJECTIVE 1: Students use a variety of values (lights and darks).

  • Exceeds Expectations: Portrait includes at least four values in addition to the value of the paper.
  • Meets Expectations: Portrait includes at least three values in addition to the value of the paper.
  • Approaches Expectations: Portrait includes at least two values in addition to the value of the paper.
  • Fails to Meet Expectations: Portrait includes just two values or only lines.

OBJECTIVE 2: Students use accurate sizes of facial features in portraits.

  • Exceeds Expectations: The sizes of almost all the parts of the face and head are close to accurate.
  • Meets Expectations: The sizes of many parts of the face and head are close to accurate.
  • Approaches Expectations: The sizes of several parts of the face and head are close to accurate.
  • Fails to Meet Expectations: Most sizes of parts of the face and head are inaccurate.