Lesson 3

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A Portrait Style from Long Ago

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Objectives

  • Students use gradual value change to suggest three-dimensional form.
  • Students identify distinctive characteristics of an historical style in art.

Arizona Visual Arts Standards

  • RELATE: Elements & Principles: PO 101, 201 & 301: Identify (Analyze) visual/tactile characteristics of artworks from diverse cultures, different places or time.
  • RELATE: Quality: PO 101, 201 & 301: Contribute to a discussion about why artworks have been valued within the context of the culture within which they were made.

Preparation

Resources

Supplies

  • Pencils
  • Sketch paper
  • Erasers
  • Middle-tone charcoal paper
  • Earth tone, black, and white pastels, chalks or conte crayons

Activities
Review: Review the theme in life that “groups of people often share ideas, yet each individual makes his or her own personal choices” and the theme in art that “artists’ styles are both personal and influenced by the world around them.” Also review the unit’s three key questions:

  1. What are the distinctive characteristics of an individual artist’s style?
  2. How do artists use value (light and dark)?
  3. How do parts of a face fit together to make a portrait?

Introduction: Display the first five slides of “A Portrait Style from Long Ago” PowerPoint to introduce the ancient Roman Egyptian portrait style as a mixture of earlier Egyptian and Roman styles. You may choose to supplement this introduction with additional online reproductions of Roman Egyptian portraits.

Assignment: Explain to students that they are to demonstrate what they’ve learned by making a self-portrait in the ancient Roman Egyptian style focusing on accurate proportions and values.

Step-By-Step-Instructions: Show remaining “A Portrait Style from Long Ago” PowerPoint slides to show steps in making a Roman Egyptian style self-portrait.

OPTIONAL: Copy a reproduction of a Roman Egyptian portrait

  1. Loosely and lightly block in outlines and features in correct proportions.
  2. Use white to add the lightest areas.
  3. Begin to add some darker areas with middle-tone conte crayon.
  4. As you start to add darker values, focus on facial features.
  5. Finally, add black as you finish your self-portrait.

In-Process Feedback: While adding white areas, ask students to partner with one or two classmates to seek fresh perceptions of proportions. Later ask students to partner again to seek fresh perceptions of values.

Presentation

  • Display completed portraits. Lead a discussion with the following questions:
  • Which portraits have very accurate proportions? Point to examples.
  • Which portraits have very accurate values? Point to examples.
  • What characteristics do the self portraits share with ancient Roman Egyptian portraits (frontal view, usually neck and shoulders, attention to hairstyle and texture of hair)?

Vocabulary

  • Portrait
  • Realistic
  • Facial Features
  • Tradition
  • Frontal
  • Middle-tone
  • Idealized
  • Proportions

Extension Idea
SOCIAL STUDIES: Make grade-appropriate connections to ancient Egyptian and Roman history.

Secondary Assessment Guides
OBJECTIVE 1: Students use gradual value change to suggest 3-dimensional form.

  • Exceeds Expectations: Student uses at least five values that consistently and effectively suggest 3-dimensional form.
  • Meets Expectations: Student uses at least five values in a way that in some places suggest 3-dimensional form.
  • Approaches Expectations: Student uses at least four different values.
  • Fails to Meet Expectations: Student uses fewer than four different values.

OBJECTIVE 2: Students identify distinctive characteristics of an historical style in art.

  • Exceeds Expectations: Student identifies at least two ways his or her portrait is similar in style to an ancient Roman-Egypt coffin portrait and explains the roots of the ancient style.
  • Meets Expectations: Student identifies at least two ways his or her portrait is similar in style to an ancient Roman-Egypt coffin portrait.
  • Approaches Expectations: Student identifies one way his or her portrait is similar in style to an ancient Roman Egypt coffin portrait.
  • Fails to Meet Expectations: Student identifies his or her portrait as using an historical style in art.