Lesson 3: Elementary & Middle School

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Animals Have Feelings, too

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“Animals Have Feelings Too” is appropriate for elementary and middle school students. Lesson Four, “Creating Cartoon Characters,” is appropriate for high school students.

Objectives

  1. Students are able to give animals human emotions (personification).
  2. Students are able to change parts of a drawing to express feelings.
  3. Students are able to use lines expressively.

Arizona Visual Arts Standards

  • CREATE: 3. Elements and Principles: PO 101 & 102: Identify [select] and use elements and principles to organize the composition of his or her own artwork.
  • CREATE: 5. Quality: PO 001, 101 & 102: Identify successful aspects of his or her own artwork and possible revisions.
  • RELATE: 4. Meanings and Purposes: PO 001, 101, & 201: Interpret meanings and/or purposes of an artwork using subject matter and symbols [or themes].
  • EVALUATE: 4. Meanings or Purposes: PO 001, 101 & 201: Discuss how and artist [uses subject matter, symbols and/or themes] communicates meaning and/or purpose in an artwork.

Preparation
Preview Animals Have Feelings Too PowerPoint. Preview Facial Expressions (pdf) and Animals (pdf) handouts to decide whether you will make copies as references for your students. Assemble any cartoon books, books with photographs of animals or webpage printouts of cartoons of animals you may wish to use to support students’ learning.

Decide whether you want your students to draw their animals first in pencil and then trace lines directly on those pencil drawings to change parts and add expressive lines or whether you might want to make (low contrast) photocopies of their pencil drawings with which students can experiment. Or ask students to trace their pencil drawings by holding them up to a window to provide more opportunities for experimentation.

You also may wish to allow students to color in areas of their drawings.

Resources and Supplies

Activities
Review the theme in life that “We all learn everyday” by retelling what they learned from the work of Chuck Jones about lines and creating expressive characters. Review the theme in art that “Artists learn from teachers, from other artists, on their own, from family and from the world around them.” Explain that in this lesson students will learn how to give animals human features by following the example of Chuck Jones. Also review the unit’s two key questions: a) How do artists learn how to be artists? and b) How do artists use lines expressively? Explain that in this lesson they will learn more about how Chuck Jones created cartoon characters and how he used expressive lines.

Definition and Guided Practice
Display the first 11 slides of the “Animals Have Feelings Too” PowerPoint to:

  • Show how Chuck Jones changed parts of animals to give them human feelings.
  • Define the term “personify.”
  • Analyze feelings expressed in a lion cartoon.
  • Identify how Jones changes parts of the face of his bookworm to express different feelings.
  • Compare lines Jones used in different cartoons.

Step-By-Step Instructions
Display the last seven slides of the “Animals Have Feelings Too” PowerPoint to:

  • Introduce the drawing assignment.
  • Draw an animal in pencil.
  • Change parts of the animal (face and head) to express a feeling.
  • Review line choices.
  • Trace lines to make them more varied and expressive.
  • Show student samples.

In-Process Feedback
Before students add lines to finish their drawing, ask them to partner with one or two classmates to develop ideas for improvement and suggestions about the best kinds of lines to reinforce the feeling of the drawing.

Presentation
Display the completed animal personification drawings. Lead a discussion with the following questions:

  • What parts of the animal has the student changed? How?
  • What feeling does the animal express?
  • What kinds of lines did the student choose?

Art Vocabulary

  • Cartoon
  • Character
  • Curved / curvy
  • Dark
  • Drawing
  • Exaggerated
  • Express / expression / expressive
  • Light
  • Line
  • Loopy
  • Personify
  • Shape
  • Size
  • Straight
  • Tapered
  • Thin
  • Varied
  • Wide

Assessment Guides

Objective 1. Students are able to give human emotions to an animal (personification).

  • Exceeds Expectations
    The animal drawing clearly and effectively expresses an identifiable feeling.
  • Meets Expectations
    The animal drawing expresses an identifiable feeling.
  • Approaches Expectations
    The feeling expressed in the animal drawing is inconsistent or unclear.
  • Fails to Meet Expectations
    No feeling is expressed in the animal drawing.

Objective 2. Students are able to change parts of a drawing to express feelings.

  • Exceeds Expectations:
    Several changes in the animal contribute to a clear and effective expression of an identifiable feeling in the animal drawing.
  • Meets Expectations:
    Several changes in the animal contribute to an expression of an identifiable feeling in the animal drawing.
  • Approaches Expectations:
    The animal drawing includes changes to parts of the animal.
  • Fails to Meet Expectations:
    The drawing includes no changes in parts of the animal.

Objective 3. Students are able to use lines expressively.

  • Exceeds Expectations:
    The animal drawing includes at least three different kinds of lines that reinforces the feeling expressed in the drawing.
  • Meets Expectations:
    The animal drawing includes at least three different kinds of lines.
  • Approaches Expectations:
    The animal drawing includes at least two different kinds of lines.
  • Fails to Meet Expectations:
    Lines in the drawing show no variety.