Tempe (Hilge) Bakery - Hackett House

 

 

Survey Number: HPS-236
Year Built: 1888
Architectural Style: Panel Brick Commercial

THEME / CONTEXT
This building is associated with the context of Commerce / Tourism. It falls under the theme of retail development - bakery.

HISTORIC ASSOCIATION
This building is the oldest fired brick building in Tempe, and perhaps possesses the most original integrity of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling and association of any territorial commercial building in Maricopa County. It has a high percentage of original material remaining from the time of construction and a very high percentage of material dating to the Territorial period [through 1912].

ARCHITECTURAL ASSOCIATION
The Tempe Bakery - Hackett House, at 401-405 S. Maple Avenue, is the oldest fired red brick building in Tempe, and possesses the most original integrity of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling and association of any territorial commercial building in Maricopa County. It has a high percentage of original material remaining from the time of construction and a very high percentage of material dating to the Territorial period [through 1912].

The construction of these two buildings is associated with the first significant phase of commercial development in Tempe. In response to the arrival of the railroad in 1887 and the establishment of the Territorial Normal School in 1885, the Tempe Land and Improvement Co. purchased land and laid it out in blocks for sale.

SUMMARY
The bakery complex was a part of this speculation. It was purchased by William Hilge, a German immigrant, who produced bread in his ovens and delivered it daily in Tempe and Mesa. Hilge committed suicide in 1905. In 1907, the Craig family arrived from Texas, and they converted the buildings to a residence. Their daughter, Estelle, later married Roy Hackett, and lived on the property until it was sold to the City of Tempe in 1974. This property was placed on the National Register of Historic places in 1974. The building is currently the home of the Tempe Sister City organization.

The Tempe Bakery - Hackett House property includes two fired red brick structures. Building A, at the northwest corner of the property, is two stories tall, rectilinear in plan, and has a double sloping roof enclosed by a parapet wall. A wood-floored, hipped roof, screened porch surrounds the north, west and south sides of the second story. It extends eight feet over the public right or way and is supported by eleven posts, three square [1912], and eight round [1889]. Main access to the ground floor is through two double doors at the northwest corner. Access to the second story is by a wooden stairs on the south façade. The interior wall arrangements are original, and the bakery shelves, counters, and display window are still intact in the north room of the ground floor. Building B, located on the west property line 20 feet south of building A, is a single-story brick building nearly square in plan, with a gable roof sloping east and west. The north gable and the walls of the northeast room are of framed board and batten construction. An open, two-story wood porch is added to the north façade, and a sloping roofed porch extends over the public right-of-way along the entire length of the west façade. The interior is divided into four rooms; the west two formed the original 1888 bake house building, which was a flat-roofed structure with the oven on stone footings in the south room. In 1895, the gable and eastern half of the building were added, with an adobe-based oven in the southeast room. The main entry to this building was once in the north façade, but when the building was remodeled as a residence in 1908, four windows and a central doorway were introduced into the west facade, creating a new entry.

SOURCES
Historic Structure Report + Work Program, J. W. Garrison; Archaeological Test Excavation at the Roy Hackett House, L.M. Stone, ARS; Interview with Estelle Hackett by Helen Harter, 1970; Tempe News, 1888-1982; C.J. Dryer, Birds Eye View of Tempe - Map, 1888; Tempe Historical Museum photograph collection, document collection; National Register Nomination.